GamingGPUsNews

NVIDIA’s RTX 4080 “Lovelace” Architecture Very Similar to Ampere: RTX 30 Series on Steroids

NVIDIA’s next-gen RTX 40 series graphics cards are slated to launch in the third quarter of 2022. Based on the Ada Lovelace microarchitecture, the next-gen GeForce lineup is set to improve compute density and double down on ray-tracing performance. There will likely be some tweaks to the SM (Streaming Multiprocessor) as we’ve seen over the last several generations, and that’s about it. At least on a microarchitectural level.

According to Greymon55, the Lovelace-based RTX 4070, RTX 4080, RTX 4090, along with their brethren will essentially be a miniaturization of their RTX 30 series predecessors on TSMC’s N5 (5nm) node. NVIDIA also plans to increase the die size to nearly 1000mm^2, and stuff up to 18,000 FP32 ALUs or CUDA cores on the top-end AD102 die. Of course, ray-tracing performance will get special attention as more and more titles adopt the technology. You can expect either a doubling of RT cores or some sparse matrix-grade optimization to significantly enhance the RT capabilities.

GPUTU102GA102AD102GH202
ArchTuringAmpereAda LovelaceHopper
ProcessTSMC 12nmSam 8nm LPPTSMC 5nm3nm?
GPC6712~20
TPC364272~140
SMs7284144~300
Shaders4,60810,75218,432~36,000?
TFLOPs16.137.690 TFLOPs?150 TFLOPs+
Memory11GB GDDR624GB GDDR6X24GB GDDR6X32GB GDDR7?
Bus Width384-bit384-bit384-bit512-bit
TGP250W350W500W+600W+
LaunchSep 2018Sep 20Aug-Sep 20222024

Other than that, as already mentioned, the SM will almost certainly get a shakedown either in terms of ALU count and/or partitioning. Other than that, there’s not much else that should change. The Tensor cores should more or less stay unchanged, perhaps even getting a trim. This sheer focus on compute density and ray-tracing performance are what will likely push the power consumption of the RTX 4080/4090 over 500W despite leveraging TSMC’s cutting-edge 5nm node.

Areej

Computer hardware enthusiast, PC gamer, and almost an engineer. Former co-founder of Techquila (2017-2019), a fairly successful tech outlet. Been working on Hardware Times since 2019, an outlet dedicated to computer hardware and its applications.
Back to top button