GPUsNews

NVIDIA Expects to Earn $400 Million From Sale of CMP “Cryptomining Processors” in Q2 2021; $5 Billion Annually (Long Term)

With the falling cryptocurrency prices, most are under the impression that NVIDIA’s CMP cards are a temporary affair. However, the chipmaker is looking to earn several hundred million off miners in the coming years if not billions. In the first quarter of 2021, NVIDIA reported revenue of $155 million from the sale of its CMP parts, with an impressive $400 million expected in the second quarter.

Certain analysts expect the company to make a whopping $1.5 billion this year from the CMP segment, and that’s a conservative prediction to boot. NVIDIA has plans to earn $5 billion on an annual basis from the sale of miner-specific products in the long term. That’s pretty much the same as its quarterly revenue today, including the gaming and the data center business. Therefore, as you can probably guess, Jensen is looking to make CMP a major source of revenue for NVIDIA.

30X40X50X90X
ArchitectureTuring (TU116)Turing (TU106)Turing (TU104)Ampere (GA102)
Ethereum Hash Rate26 MH/s36 MH/s45 MH/s86 MH/s
Rated Power125 W185 W250 W320 W
Power Connectors1x 8-pin1x 8-pin2x 8-pin2x 8-pin
Memory Size6GB8GB10GB10GB
Starting AvailabilityQ1Q1Q2Q2
The CMP lineup is based on the Turing and Ampere dies

Analysts expect NVIDIA’s yearly revenue to grow by 20% in the coming years, which means that we can easily expect its quarterly revenue to increase to $10 billion or more in 4-5 years, with CMP accounting for 10-20% of it. China’s ban on mining means that most cryptomining farms are moving to the US, Russia, and other American countries. This should also strengthen CMP sales as unlike China, there aren’t as many ASIC devices available in these markets.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

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