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Microsoft: Windows 11 Running on 1st Gen Ryzen and Intel 7th Gen CPUs Won’t Get Updates, Incl. Security Updates

Just the other day, it was reported that Microsoft wouldn’t prevent users from installing Windows 11 on Zen 1 and 7th Gen Intel Core systems (at least not completely). There is a catch, though. You won’t be able to upgrade your PC directly from Windows 10 to 11 if you are running older hardware, not in the official requirement list. Instead, you’ll have to download the Windows 11 ISO from the official Microsoft website and do a clean install. 

Microsoft has now stated that users running Windows 11 on older unsupported CPUs such as 1st Gen Ryzen or 7th Gen Kaby Lake might not get updates, including security updates. According to the company, unsupported processors (PC running them), won’t be entitled to receive Windows Updates, and these include even critical security and driver updates.

Quite frankly, I don’t buy it. Microsoft has never withheld security updates for even decade-old operating systems. I don’t see it happening with Windows 11 either. The company might block feature updates, but that’s the extent of it. For someone who installed the OS via the ISO, to begin with, this shouldn’t be a major concern.

As for driver updates, I mean yeah sure, it has been much easier with Windows 10 as it automatically downloads all the required packages. However, there are only a couple of drivers that you really do need. These are audio, graphics, network, and in some cases, firmware. Graphics can be downloaded via the GeForce/Radeon CP, audio and network are a bit harder but nothing too complicated. In the case of firmware, you mostly won’t need to download them separately, but if you really do, they can be downloaded from the motherboard vendor’s website along with the other two.

Via: The Verge

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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