CPUsNews

Intel Alder Lake Mobile Flagship Core i9-12900HK Beats Apple M1 Max, Destroys AMD’s Ryzen 9 5900HX

A few days back Apple launched its new MacBooks, replacing the incumbent Intel processors with the M1 Max and Pro. We compared the former against Intel’s Tiger Lake-H flagship and found Apple’s in-house silicon to be faster as well as more efficient. With the next-gen Alder Lake family set to launch next month, that comparison is more or less redundant. Luckily, a Geekbench test of the top-end Alder Lake-P SKU has surfaced, giving us an idea of just how capable Intel’s hybrid core processors are.

The benchmark (courtesy of WCCFTech) shows the Core i9-12900HK beating the M1 Max by a notable margin across both single-threaded and multi-threaded metrics. Furthermore, the contemporary Intel and AMD mobile flagships are pretty much eviscerated by the 12900HK.

Source: WCCFTech

In the single-core benchmark, the Core i9-12900HK is 23% faster than the top AMD Cezanne part, with the Core i9-11980HK being 14% slower. Meanwhile, the Alder Lake mobility lead edges past the M1 Max by roughly 4%.

Source: WCCFTech

In the multi-threaded test, the Core i9-12900K extends its lead over the other processors. It’s a whopping 60% faster than the Ryzen 9 5980HX. The Core i9-11980HK does a bit better, trailing its successor by 34%. As for the M1 Max, it’s once again just 4% slower than Intel’s latest and greatest mobile SKU.

While one benchmark isn’t enough to draw a definitive conclusion, we can be sure that Intel will be returning to the PC market with a bang later this year. A potent IPC gain, paired with a hybrid core architecture should allow the chipmaker to balance single and multi-threaded performance with power efficiency. The first wave of Alder Lake parts is slated by the end of this month.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
Back to top button