GamingGPUsNews

AMD Launches the Radeon RX 6600 for $329 w/ 8GB Memory and 32MB of Infinity Cache

AMD today announced the launch of the Radeon RX 6600 graphics cards aiming at the budget audience for a price tag of $329. Paired with 32MB of Infinity Cache, 8GB of GDDR6 memory, and 28 Compute Units (1,792 shaders), the RX 6600 is ideally suited for 1080p gaming:

ModelCompute UnitsMemory (GDDR6)Game Clock (MHz)Boost Clock (MHz)Memory InterfaceInfinity CacheTBPPrice (USD SEP)
AMD Radeon RX 6600288 GB2,044Up to 2,491128-bit32 MB132W$329
  • AMD Smart Access Memory (SAM) – Now supporting AMD Radeon RX 5000 Series graphics, SAM unlocks higher performance when pairing AMD Radeon RX 5000 or Radeon RX 6000 Series graphics with AMD Ryzen 5000 or select Ryzen 3000 Series Desktop Processors and AMD 500-series motherboards by giving AMD Ryzen processors access to the entire high-speed GDDR6 GPU memory.
  • AMD FidelityFX – An open-source toolkit of visual enhancement effects for game developers available at AMD GPUOpen. The new AMD FidelityFX Super Resolution (FSR) spatial upscaling technology delivers 2X faster performance in “Performance Mode” compared to native 1080p in select titles. To date, game developers have added support or announced plans to add support for FSR in 50 top games and game engines.
  • Microsoft Windows 11 Support – AMD Radeon graphics cards are optimized for the latest Windows 11 performance optimizations and features, including DirectX12 Ultimate, Auto HDR, Microsoft DirectStorage and more.

The Radeon RX 6600 is expected to be available today at global etailers/retailers from AMD board partners including ASRock, ASUS, Gigabyte, MSI, PowerColor, SAPPHIRE, XFX, and Yeston, starting at an SEP of INR 26,490/- (excluding GST) in India. It is also expected to be available in high-performance pre-built systems from OEMs and system integrators beginning in October 2021.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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