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Alienware Aurora Ryzen Edition Can’t Be Shipped to Six US States Due To Excessive Power Draw

In a rather unexpected turn of events, PC manufacturers including Dell are unable to ship certain PCs to six states in the US including California, Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington due to a new Energy Consumption Tier 2 regulation that went into effect July 1, 2021. Dell’s Alienware Aurora Ryzen Edition as well as a bunch of other PCs can no longer be shipped to consumers in these states, as they draw more power than the upper limit specified in the new regulation.

A Dell spokesperson told The Register that the California Energy Commission (CEC) Tier 2 implementation has defined a mandatory energy efficiency standard for PCs – including desktops, AIOs, and mobile gaming systems, preventing the vendor from shipping select configurations of the Alienware Aurora R10 and R12 to the affected states.

Yes, this was driven by the California Energy Commission (CEC) Tier 2 implementation that defined a mandatory energy efficiency standard for PCs – including desktops, AIOs and mobile gaming systems. This was put into effect on July 1, 2021. Select configurations of the Alienware Aurora R10 and R12 were the only impacted systems across Dell and Alienware.

As per the new regulation, each product can only draw a certain maximum amount of power in kilowatt-house per year. This is determined by the number of devices and the power consumption from various chips such as graphics processing units (GPU) and high-performance memory. The power limit can be increased by “adders” depending on the type of the device such as central processors, graphics processors, memory, and storage.

Via: WCCFTech

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

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