GamingNews

Scalpers Have Scored Over $43 Million by Reselling PS5 Hardware at eBay and StockX

By taking advantage of the limited PS5 stocks, scalpers have made over $43 million by reselling the hardware for as much as 260% more than the MSRP. Most of these sales happened over sites like eBay and StockX, with the former contributing nearly twice as much to the overall figure of $43 million.

The bulk of the scalping took place between the 22nd of October and 22nd of December after which both the overall sales and scalper profits dwindled due to the lack of global stock.

Console GraphMSRPTotal SoldMedian PricePast Week Median PriceCasual Scalper Break EvenSophisticated Scalper Break EvenTotal SalesEstimated eBay/PayPal ProfitsEstimated Scalper Profits
PS5 Digital$39918,329$894$799$522$406$16,622,295$2,114,599$6,104,994
PS5 Disc$49961,586$987$849$649$507$63,354,245$8,064,429$20,205,041
TotalN/A79,915N/AN/AN/AN/A$79,976,540$10,179,028$26,310,035
eBay Sales

Scalpers sold nearly 80K units over at eBay, with the Disc variant contributing to the majority of the sales (61.5K) and the remaining 18K being the Disc-less Digital variants. The former sold for an average price of $987 while the latter went for just under $900, with scalpers getting $400 to $600 for each unit sold. Overall, the total scalper profits at eBay totaled $26 million, with the Disc variant contributing $20 million to the figure.

ConsoleTotal SoldAverage Sales PriceLast Week Average PriceTotal Sales VolumeEstimated StockX ProfitsEstimated Scalper Profits
PS5 Digital27,695$788$405$21,823,660$1,964,129$7,048,447
PS5 Disc49,394$845$725$41,737,930$3,756,414$9,800,387
Total77,089N/AN/A$63,561,590$5,720,543$16,848,834
StockX Sales

Although the total number of sales at StockX was nearly the same at 77K units, the scalper profits were markedly lower, with the Digital Variant pulling in $7 million for the resellers and the traditional Disc Edition bringing in $9 million, for a total of $16.8 million, a fair bit less than eBay.

Source

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button