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Resident Evil Village to Run at 4K 45 FPS on PS5 and Xbox Series X; Series S @ 1440p 30 FPS

According to Capcom, Resident Evil Village will run at a resolution of 4K 60 FPS on the next-gen PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X consoles, with a drop to 45 FPS upon enabling ray-tracing. Considering how intensive ray-tracing generally is, it likely means that we’re looking at a single ray-traced effect, either ray-traced shadows or ray-traced global illumination, or perhaps both but at a lower resolution, possibly with less than one ray per pixel.

The budget-grade Xbox Series S will run the game at 1440p 45 FPS without ray-tracing and at 1440p 30 FPS with it enabled. The previous-generation consoles will run the game at a much lower resolution. The PS4 will be set to 900p at 45 FPS while the Xbox One will run at 900p 30 FPS. The mid-generational consoles, PS4 Pro, and Xbox One X will perform much better with a target resolution of 4K 30 FPS or 1080p 60 FPS. As for Google’s Stadia service, the game will be rendered at 1080p and then upscaled to 4K at 60 FPS. The recommended and minimum specifications for the PC port are as follows:

Minimum Requirements (1080p @ 60 FPS with Low Graphics):

  • Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
  • OS:  Windows 10 64-bit
  • Processor:  Intel Core i5-7500 or AMD Ryzen 3 1200
  • Memory:  8 GB RAM
  • Graphics:  Nvidia GeForce GTX 1050 Ti or AMD Radeon RX 560
  • DirectX:  Version 12 (DirectX 12)
  • Additional Notes: Frame rate will be lower in graphics-intensive scenes.
  • Nvidia GeForce RTX 2060 or AMD Radeon RX 6700 XT are required to activate Ray Tracing.

Recommended Requirements (1080p @ 60 FPS with High Graphics):

  • Processor:  Intel Core i7 8700 or AMD Ryzen 5 3600
  • Memory:  16GB RAM
  • Graphics:  Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 or AMD Radeon RX 5700
  • Additional Notes: Frame rate will be lower in graphics-intensive scenes.
  • Nvidia GeForce RTX 2070 or AMD Radeon RX 6700 XT are required to activate RayTracing.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

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