GamingGPUsNews

Over 100 Games now Support NVIDIA DLSS, GeForce GPUs Ready for Windows 11: Driver for Alan Wake Remastered Out

NVIDIA has a bunch of announcements for GeForce gamers surrounding DLSS and Reflex, improving gaming performance and visual fidelity. A total of more than 100 games now support DLSS. In addition, gamers also get a Game Ready Driver for the launch of Windows 11 that includes support for eight upcoming games.

NVIDIA DLSS Support Hits the Century Mark, as Indie Developers Take Advantage of the UE4 Plug-in

Today NVIDIA added 28 games to the list of titles shipping with DLSS. The additions are a result of the Unreal Engine 4 DLSS plugin that makes the technology fast and easy to integrate into games. In total, there are now over 100 games and applications that support DLSS shipping today.

Alan Wake and more Coming Soon With DLSS

NVIDIA announced two new DLSS games that are coming soon:

  • Alan Wake Remastered (10/5) – NVIDIA DLSS delivers up to a 2X increase in performance at 4K. Every GeForce RTX GPU can get over 60 FPS at max settings in 4K with NVIDIA DLSS enabled in Alan Wake Remastered.
  • INDUSTRIA (9/30) – With settings maxed out, and ray tracing enabled, NVIDIA DLSS accelerates your performance by up to 2X in INDUSTRIA.

NVIDIA Reflex Available In Splitgate and Deathloop This Month

NVIDIA Reflex is quick and easy for developers to add to their titles thanks to SDKs, plugins, and extensive documentation. Over 20 games have incorporated the latency-optimizing technology, and this month Splitgate and Deathloop have joined the list, bringing latency savings of up to 50%.

  • Alan Wake Remastered
  • Deathloop
  • Diablo II: Resurrected
  • Far Cry 6
  • Hot Wheels Unleashed
  • Industria
  • New World
  • World War Z: Aftermath
  • HyperX Pulsefire Haste Gaming Mouse
  • Roccat Burst Core
  • Roccat Kone Pro
  • Roccat Kone Pro Air
  • ASUS ROG Swift PG279QM 240Hz, 1440p G-SYNC NVIDIA Reflex Monitor is now available.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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