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NVIDIA’s RTX 3080 Got 5x More Stock than the Radeon RX 6800 XT; RTX 3070 14x More than the RX 6800

It’s been nearly a year since the graphics card shortages began. Most high-end graphics cards are presently being sold 2-3x more than their MSRP, with the GeForce RTX 3080 going for $2,199 (MSRP: $699), the RTX 3070 for $1,391 (MSRP: $499) and the RTX 3060 Ti for $1,375 (MSRP: $399). The price gains are more prominent for NVIDIA cards due to their substantially better Ether mining capabilities, but can be also attributed to the better stocks of the Ampere parts:

April 13 to 27 (eBay sales figures)

For example, in the second half of April, over 900 RTX 3080s were sold with an average price tag of $2,199 while only 114 RX 6800 XTs were sold on AMD’s side. That’s nearly 5x more Ampere GPUs. A similar pattern can be seen in the RTX 3090 vs RX 6900 XT equation: The former sold over 700 units on eBay while the latter was limited to under 200. Stocks for the RTX 3070 were much better compared to the RX 6800, with the former selling nearly 1,600 units for $1,391 and the latter being limited to just over 100 units for $1,320 on average. That’s almost 14x higher. Out of all the RDNA 2 cards, the RX 6700 XT had the most shipments with 330 units sold between 13th and 27th April on eBay, albeit the price was still roughly twice as much as the MSRP.

March 31 to April 13 (eBay sales figures)

Compared to the first half of April, the shipments of the RTX 3080 grew from 654 to over 900, an increase of nearly 40% while the RTX 3070 went from 1,112 units to 1,598 units, an increase of 45%. AMD’s higher-end Big Navi graphics cards also saw notable growth in shipments with the RX 6800 going from just 68 units in early April to 114 in late April. The RX 6800 XT and 6900 XT also saw similar levels of improvement in stocks, but the volume of the RX 6700 Xt remained more or less the same.

Thanks to Tomshardware for the stats.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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