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NVIDIA Shares Reach All-Time High as Notebooks Account For 30% Revenue

Following NVIDIA’s positive first fiscal report, green stocks have hit an all-time time high of $361 per share. A few days back, NVIDIA reported its first-quarter earnings, satiating both investors as well as industry analysts. NVIDIA’s overall revenue grew by 39% YoY, bolstered by a strong data-center business and a healthy gaming market. Both markets saw notable gains, but the former was the highlight with a massive growth of 80% YoY, crossing the $1B mark for the first time.

While the immediate results were less pronounced, positive outlook is finally starting to have a noteworthy impact. In the last few days, NVIDIA’s share value has swelled by approximately 3% or $10, to $361, an all-time high for the stock.

In other related NVIDIA news, the company CFO in an interview has revealed that the notebook market has also been growing by leaps and bounds, and now accounts for 30% of the overall revenue.

During the quarter, our notebook business finished [its] ninth quarter of year-on-year growth…Our notebook business was aided by COVID-19, by people moving to e-tail [purchases]. Our notebook business…now represents almost 30% of our overall Gaming business.

Colette Kress, NVIDIA CFO

It looks like the COVID-19 pandemic has not only helped the Data Center business, but also the mobile market. As more and more people begin working from home, the demand for notebooks has grown significantly. Just a few months back, NVIDIA launched the Super variants of the RTX 20 series mobile GPUs. The company’s upcoming architecture Ampere was unveiled at the GTC keynote. The A100, the first Ampere product is a Data Center part for accelerating compute and AI workloads, and offers significant improvements over the preceding Volta V100 part.

The consumer parts based on Ampere are expected to be launched in the coming months, and the same goes for AMD’s rival Navi 2x GPUs. This time around both lineups will support hardware-level ray-tracing, though, the implementations will undoubtedly vary.

What is Ray-Tracing and How Does it Work? Are NVIDIA’s RTX GPUs Worth It?

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!

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