GamingGPUsNews

NVIDIA RTX GPU Market Share Grows to 25% of all GeForce Cards, CMP Mining Revenue Drops by 60%

NVIDIA has reported another stellar quarter with a revenue of $7.1 billion for the third quarter of 2021, highlighting a YoY growth of 50%. Both the gaming and data center businesses registered a strong quarter, growing by over 40% YoY and 5% QoQ. The chipmaker’s GPU sales have remained strong despite lean inventory, and limited shipments. According to NVIDIA CFO Colette Kress, desktop GPU supply has improved but is still quite a bit short of demand (which has remained strong).

The mobile (gaming notebook) market remains a key segment for NVIDIA, with Q3 seeing strong year-on-year growth, courtesy of increased demand for higher-end RTX laptops. Team Green is touting the RTX lineups as its “biggest upper refresh cycle” with both gamers and creators rapidly upgrading from older GTX-based solutions. A rough estimate from the company puts the share of RTX GPUs at 25% of all GeForce systems.

As for cryptomining, the demand for the miner-specific CMP cards continued to decline in the third quarter, falling by 60% compared to the previous quarter. The CMP revenue fell from over $250 million in Q2 2021 to just $105 million in Q3 2021. Furthermore, NVIDIA claims that nearly all Ampere “RTX 30 series” graphics cards shipped in the third quarter of 2021 were the lite hash rate models that cut the Ethereum hash rate in half.

This supposedly dissuades miners from hoarding NVIDIA’s RTX 30 series GPUs, but the market doesn’t quite agree with this assumption. The high price of Ether continues to drive decent revenue for miners, and the acute shortage of GPUs makes it hard to gauge the situation.

Via: SA

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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