GamingGPUsNews

NVIDIA RTX 4080, RTX 4090 to Feature Clock Speeds Exceeding 3GHz, Likely to Break the 100 TFLOPs Barrier [Report]

NVIDIA’s next-gen Lovelace graphics cards are rumored to feature considerably higher TGPs than their predecessors. We’re looking at power draws of up to 600W for the RTX 4090 and even more for the RTX 4090 Ti. This is despite the fact that these chips will be fabbed on TSMC’s 4nm N4 process which is easily one of the most efficient nodes on the planet. The excessive power consumption won’t be for nothing though, and the RTX 4090 (based on the AD102 die) will pack around 16K FP32 cores.

The AD102 die will get a haircut before going into the RTX 4090, dropping the core count from 18,432 to 16,384. This means that a few of the SMs, TPCs, and GPCs along with the L2 cache will also be axed. As for the clocks, Kopite7kimi states that we can expect core boost clocks well over 2.8GHz.

GPUTU102GA102AD102AD103AD104
ArchTuringAmpereAda LovelaceAda LovelaceAda Lovelace
ProcessTSMC 12nmSam 8nm LPPTSMC 5nmTSMC 5nmTSMC 5nm
GPC671275
TPC3642724230
SMs72841448460
Shaders4,60810,75218,43210,7527,680
FP32 TF16.137.6~100 TFLOPs?~50 TFLOPs~35 TFLOPs
Memory11GB GDDR624GB GDDR6X24GB GDDR6X16GB GDDR616GB GDDR6
L2 Cache6MB6MB96MB64MB48MB
Bus Width384-bit384-bit384-bit256-bit192-bit
TGP250W350W600W?350W?250W?
LaunchSep 2018Sep 2020Aug-Sep 2022Q4 2022Q4 2022

We might get a GPU with 16,384 pulsating cores running at a whopping 3GHz and custom liquid-cooled models clocked even higher. The more accessible RTX 4080 featuring the AD103 die should pack around 10,000 cores and boosts exceeding 3GHz. The peak power draw should stay in the 400-450W range.

Clock speeds of 3GHz should allow the RTX 3090 to push through the 100 TFLOPs barrier albeit with significant heat generation and an unreasonable power draw. The RTX 4080 will hover a bit over (or under) 50 TFLOPs while the RTX 4070 should be rated over 30 TFLOPs. Keep in mind that these figures don’t mean much in terms of real world performance but are a reminder of how far GPUs have come.

Areej

Computer hardware enthusiast, PC gamer, and almost an engineer. Former co-founder of Techquila (2017-2019), a fairly successful tech outlet. Been working on Hardware Times since 2019, an outlet dedicated to computer hardware and its applications.

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