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NVIDIA RTX 4080/4090 and AMD RDNA Reportedly Launching in October 2022

According to tipster @Greymon (Twitter), NVIDIA and AMD will be prepping to launch their next-gen graphics cards next year. Both the GeForce RTX 40 series graphics cards and AMD’s RDNA 3 lineup are slated for a late 2022 launch, so this is merely a confirmation of sorts, with a finer-grained timeframe of the launch schedule. It’s worth noting that NVIDIA and AMD will leverage the same process node (TSMC’s N5) for their next-gen GPU lineups. Therefore, the shortages may not subside even late into next year.

To make matter worse, AMD will be directly competing with Intel’s Xe-HPG GPUs for the capacity of the Rembrandt APUs, the console SoCs, and the secondary RDNA 3 chiplets. All these lineups are based on TSMC’s N6 process node.

For AMD RNDA 3 (RX 7800 XT/7900 XT): We’re looking at six groups of four SIMDs each for the Navi 33 which results in a stream processor count of 7,680. For the chiplet based Navi 31 GPU, double that figure to 15,360 and you’ve got a monster of a graphics card. Considering the sheer increase in compute capabilities, the Infinity Cache will also be increased by 50%, at the very least. This should easily push the overall raster performance of Navi 31 to more than twice as much as the Radeon RX 6900 XT, with Navi 33 beating the RX 6800 XT by 30-50%.

For NVIDIA Lovelace (RTX 4080/4090): From what we’ve heard, Lovelace should easily offer twice as much performance as the contemporary Ampere parts, with an FP32 core count of up to 18,432. The AD102 flagship is expected to feature a total SM count of 144 distributed across 12 GPCs. That’s a 71% gain in raw compute performance over the GA102. Pair that with architectural and process refinements, and you’re easily looking at a gain of 2x.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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