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NVIDIA RTX 3090 w/ 24GB GDDR6X VRAM to be Priced @ $1399; No RTX 3080 Ti in 2020 [Rumor]

As per the latest round of rumors, NVIDIA won’t be launching the RTX 3080 Ti just yet. Instead, we’ll be getting the RTX 3090 (Titan?) as the new flagship of the GeForce 30 series lineup with a massive VRAM buffer of 24GB GDDR6X. As for the price, the board partner versions of the RTX 3090 will start at $1,399 while the FE as always will cost an additional $100, setting you back for $1,499.

This rumor comes from Chiphell, and no matter how well-reputed the source may be, I suggest taking it with a grain of salt. There have been way too many conflicting reports about the pricing and specifications of the top-tier Ampere GPU (RTX 3080|3090) in recent days to say anything with certainty. As I had earlier reported, the RTX 3090 or Titan (whatever it’s called) will launch with 24GB of GDDR6X memory, not 10 or 12GB. The price will most certainly be higher than a grand, possibly even in the $2,000 to $2,500 range.

In line with tradition, we will most likely not see the RTX 3080 Ti at launch. NVIDIA will save it for later (possibly early 2021) to tackle AMD’s much-anticipated Big Navi GPU. The pricing will of course depend on how well the higher-end Navi 2x graphics cards are received. The specs will be nearly identical to the 3090 with minor cuts to the die.

As for the RTX 3080 and 3070, we’ll almost certainly see them in September. Considering the lack of competition in the high-end GPU space, I fear NVIDIA will try to fleece early buying with a price tag as high as $999, the same as the RTX 2080 Ti while offering a raw performance boost of around 20-30%. The highlight will obviously be the ray-tracing performance which will be a big step up from Turing. With high-profile titles like Cyberpunk 2077, Bloodlines, Dying Light 2, etc all set to get ray-tracing support, NVIDIA will no doubt flaunt the superiority of the new GPUs in these upcoming blockbusters, all the while shying away from providing any hard figures on pure raster performance.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!

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