GPUsNews

NVIDIA RTX 3080 Ti Specs Revised Once Again: Price Increased and Shader Count Dropped, Plus Mining Restrictions

According to a report from ITHome, NVIDIA is prepping the GeForce RTX 3080 Ti for a mid-May launch with an increased price tag of 7,999 Yuan or $1,199 (USD). The die has been updated from the earlier planned GA102-250 to GA102-202/302 with a shader count of 10,240 cores and a bus width of 384-bits. The GPU will be paired with 12GB of GDDR6X memory, just 2 GB more than the RTX 3080 and half as much compared to the RTX 3090:

Graphics Card NameGPUFP32 CoresMemoryMemory BusBandwidth
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090GA102-30010,49624GB GDDR6X384-bit936GB/s
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 TiGA102-25010,24012GB GDDR6X384-bit?936GB/s?
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080GA102-2008,70410GB GDDR6X320-bit760GB/s
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 TiGA104-400-A16,144?8GB/16GB GDDR6X256-bit760GB/s
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070GA104-3005,8888GB GDDR6256-bit448GB/s
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 TiGA104-2004,8648GB GDDR6256-bit448GB/s
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060GA106-3003,58412GB GDDR6192-bit360GB/s
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3050 TiGA1076GB GDDR6128/160-bit?
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3050GA107-3002,3044GB/6GB GDDR6128-bit

As already reported earlier, the new die has been designed to reduce the Ether mining performance with a combined firmware-hardware block in place. The new firmware for the GPU runs graphics workloads but CUDA and ether-mining don’t work with the new beta driver. On the other hand, if the old firmware is flashed to a new chip, the device won’t boot. Strangely, the device ID of the older and newer chips is the same which allows flashing the new BIOS to older QS, but even that doesn’t work in all cases. If the GPUs have the same PCI Device ID, then the override command can be used to flash a custom BIOS as many enthusiasts do at present. However, similar to the A and non-A Turing dies, the device ID is different for the new dies, preventing cross-flashing of the firmware from the older to the newer GPUs.

Source: ITHome

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different. Left late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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