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NVIDIA RTX 3080 Super (Mobile) to Reportedly Feature 7,680 Shaders and 256-bit Bus w/ 16GB GDDR6 Memory

There have been plenty of rumors circulating on the internet regarding the GeForce RTX 30 Super mobile lineup, but nothing from reliable sources, up until now that is. A tweet from @kopite7kimi seemingly confirms that the GeForce RTX 3080 Super will be based on the GA103S die, with the GA107S powering the lower-end Super lineup. From what we already know, the GA103S core will feature up to 7,680 FP32 cores and a 256-bit bus (as per the source). Since the RTX 3080 mobile already comes with 16GB of GDDR6 memory, we’re likely to see the same retained with its Super variant.

Source: 3DCenter

GDDR6X memory is unlikely to find its way on the mobile GPU due to power constraints, and the 1,500 odd cores added with the new die should provide a sufficient performance boost over the existing mobile flagship. Therefore, to sum up, the GeForce RTX 3080 Super is likely going to feature 7,680 FP32 shaders paired with 16GB of GDDR6 memory via a 256-bit bus, resulting in a bandwidth of 448GB/s. The RTX 3070 Super should be upgraded to 6,144 CUDA cores from 5,120, with the same 256-bit bus and 448GB/s bandwidth. It’s hard to say whether NVIDIA will upgrade the VRAM buffer to 16GB, but considering that AMD’s RX 6800 mobile lineup already features 12GB, it’s highly likely.

As far as the lower-end Super lineup is concerned, it’s too early to say anything for sure. It’s possible that the Super upgrade may be limited to just the higher-end parts, with the remaining SKUs getting a price cut or frequency boost. Either way, we won’t know anything for sure till NVIDIA actually announces these parts.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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