GPUsNews

NVIDIA RTX 3060 Mobile Has More Cores than the Desktop Variant

It turns out that the desktop variant of the GeForce RTX 3060 is less powerful than its mobile variant, at least on paper. The RTX 3060 for notebooks is based on the higher-end variant of the GA106 die with 3,840 FP32 cores and a boost clock of up to 1,703MHz, whereas the desktop-grade 3060 is limited to 3,584 cores, but a higher boost clock of 1.78GHz or 1,780MHz.

Although both GPUs use the same GA106 die, the mobile version features the nearly fully enabled variant with 3,840 cores working out of the total 4,096. The desktop variant disables two SMs, bringing the total core count down to 3,584. At the same time, the latter does feature twice as much video memory (12GB), while the mobile GPU is limited to half as much.

The bus width is the same on both the dies at 192-bit, but as expected the mobile die is paired with slower memory chips (12Gbps), reducing the bandwidth to 288GB/s.

GPU NameNVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080
GPU SKUGA106GA104-770GA104-775
FP32 Cores3,84051206144
Base Clock~900 MHz~1100 MHz~1100 MHz
Boost Clock~1700 MHz~1620 MHz~1700 MHz
Memory Size6 GB GDDR6 @ 12Gbps8 GB GDDR6 @ 12Gbps8/16 GB GDDR6 @ 12Gbps
Bus Width192-bit256-bit256-bit
Bandwidth288 GB/s384 GB/s384 GB/s
Standard Power/Max-Q Power80-115W/60-70W115-150W/80-90W115-150W/80-90W
Mobile Ampere Lineup
Graphics Card NameGPUFP32 CoresMemoryMemory BusBandwidth
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090GA102-30010,49624GB GDDR6X384-bit936GB/s
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 TiGA102-25010,49620GB GDDR6X320-bit760GB/s
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080GA102-2008,70410GB GDDR6X320-bit760GB/s
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 TiGA104-4007,4248GB GDDR6X320-bit760GB/s
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070GA104-3005,8888GB GDDR6256-bit448GB/s
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 TiGA104-2004,8648GB GDDR6256-bit/192-bit448GB/s
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060GA106-3003,84012GB GDDR6192-bit360GB/s
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3050 TiGA1063,5846GB GDDR6160-bit?
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3050GA107-3002,3044GB/6GB GDDR6128/160-bit
Desktop Ampere Lineup

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

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