GamingGPUsNews

NVIDIA RTX 3060, 3070, and 3080 Mobile Announced: Starting @ $999, Avail From 26th Jan

NVIDIA has announced the launch of its mobile RTX 30 series “Ampere” GPUs, namely the RTX 3060, 3070, and 3080 mobile. Notebooks featuring the 3060 will start at $999 while the top-end 3080-powered devices will start at a whopping $1,999. As already reported earlier, the laptop variant of the RTX 3080 will be based on the GA104, the same die that powers the RTX 3070, rather than the GA102 which forms the desktop-grade RTX 3080/3090.

GPU NameNVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080
GPU SKUGA106GA104-770GA104-775
FP32 Cores3,8405,1206,144
Base Clock~900 MHz~1100 MHz~1100 MHz
Boost Clock~1700 MHz~1620 MHz~1700 MHz
Memory Size6 GB GDDR6 @ 12Gbps8 GB GDDR6 @ 12Gbps8/16 GB GDDR6 @ 12Gbps
Bus Width192-bit256-bit256-bit
Bandwidth288 GB/s384 GB/s384 GB/s
Standard Power/Max-Q Power80-115W/60-70W115-150W/80-90W115-150W/80-90W
  • GeForce RTX 3060 laptops start at $999 and are expected to be faster than the RTX 2080 Super mobile. It will feature 3072 FP32 cores and 6GB of memory paired with a 192-bit bus.
  • GeForce RTX 3070 laptops start at $1,299 and are 50 percent faster than those equipped with the RTX 2070. Like its desktop counterpart, the RTX 3070 mobile will feature a 256-bit bus paired with 8GB of GDDR6 memory and 5,120 FP32 cores.
  • GeForce RTX 3080: With up to 16GB of G6 memory and up to 6,144 cores paired with a 256-bit bus, it will be the flagship Ampere mobile GPU. It delivers 100+ frames per second with ultra settings at 1440p. Systems featuring the RTX 3080 start at $1,999.

Another important announcement is the inclusion of Resizable BAR otherwise known as SAM in AMD lingo:

  • Resizable BAR: This advanced PCI Express technology enables all of the GPU memory to be accessed by the CPU at once, providing a performance boost in many games.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
Back to top button