GPUsNews

NVIDIA RTX 2070, 2080 & 2080 Ti (Turing) Have Higher Mining Profitability w/ Octopus and Grin Cryptocurrencies

These days cryptomining is one of the more profitable ventures if you’re stuck at home. For the majority of GPU miners, Ethereum has long been the go-to coin for its high profitability with modern graphics cards and other ASIC solutions. However, times are changing as more as more digital currencies are born. If you have an older NVIDIA graphics card such as the RTX 2070, 2080, or the 2080 Ti or perhaps an AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT or 6700 XT, then Ether might not be the most profitable currency to mine on your GPU.

As you can see in the above image, the GeForce RTX 2080 generates more money with Octopus (Conflux) than Ether, but the overall power consumption is higher, so the latter is slightly more profitable. However, if you’re living in a region where power is cheaper, then Conflux may just be more profitable in your case. Overclocking your GPU core also improves Conflux mining performance while Ether generally benefits from memory overclocking.

The RTX 2080 Ti (above) increases the delta between Octopus and Ethash due to the wider bus-width of the GPU, and therefore, the higher bandwidth. However, depending upon your pool, the former may still be more profitable for you.

Finally, in the case of the RTX 3070, Ether is easily the most profitable due to the high compute and bandwidth capabilities of the RTX 30 series lineup.

Nice Hash: RTX 2080 Ti

Nice Hash is popular for its simple UI and easy-to-setup configuration (although it’s slightly less profitable than most other miners). If you’re mining using Nice Hash on an RTX 2080/2080 Ti, then Ether once again turns out to not be the most profitable cryptocurrency. In this case, Grin (Cuckatoo), is a fair bit more profitable than both Ether and Octopus.

Nice Hash: RTX 3070

However, with the RTX 3070, Ether is going to be the most profitable coin regardless of your mining client and pool. The same goes for the RTX 3060, 3080, and all other RTX 30-series cards.

Image source: MinerStat

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
Back to top button