GPUsNews

NVIDIA Prioritizing Certain AIBs Over Other in Terms of Supply: Inno3D, Palit, Gainward Get Almost No Shipments

The shortage of graphics cards is an old topic of discussion at this point. However, the shortages have affected some AIBs more than the rest. For example, if you check the inventories of retailers, board partners like Inno3D, Palit, and Gainward get markedly lesser units than their larger rivals such as MSI, Zotac, ASUS, and EVGA. While this isn’t at all surprising, it’s worth having a closer look at.

Source: Graphics card prices, distribution battles over NVIDIA’s allocations and new supply bottlenecks | Insider | igor´sLAB (igorslab.de)

Checking the above table, you’ll notice that there’s a clear pattern between the supply of products and the AIBs. Certain board partners such as Inno3D, Gainward, and Palit have been getting plenty of older GTX-class Turing cards such as the GTX 1650, and much fewer newer Ampere (RTX 30) parts.

On the other hand, older, more established partners like MSI, Zotac, and ASUS have been primarily getting shipments of the RTX 3070 and 3080, and fewer units of the older GTX 16 series cards. This is primarily due to the fact that the profit margins with the barebones models of newer Ampere parts are much smaller due to the use of advanced PCBs and capacitors which makes it hard for Inno3D and Palit to stick to their relatively cheaper MSRPs. The most notable being the example of the RTX 3070 Ti and the 3080, where there’s a delta of just a few dozen dollars between the two in some cases.

Board partners like Zotac, ASUS, and MSI are focusing on their factory overclocked models which usually have higher profit margins. Galax, Inno, and Palit can’t do that as their business model primarily revolves around cheaper models (usually even lower than the FE cards). So, there you have it. Another piece of the puzzle.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button