GamingGPUs

NVIDIA Prepping GeForce RTX Super Graphics Cards for Laptops; Coming in March 2020

AMD will be making a return to the laptop gaming space with its 7nm Navi GPUs in early 2020. We can expect all-AMD powered notebooks packing the Ryzen Picasso APU (later on 7nm Zen 2) and Navi 14 GPUs bringing the price of portable gaming rigs to an all-time low. NVIDIA like always will be looking to play spoiler.

According to reports, team green will launch the Super variants of its mobile graphics card lineup in March next year to celebrate AMD’s new resurgence.

According to NotebookCheck, NVIDIA will be launching five Super GPUs for gaming laptops. And not just standard variants but Max-Q versions too. Three RTX 20 Supers and two GTX 16 Supers:

  • NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER (N18E-G3R): The GeForce RTX 2080 Super will be the new flagship, replacing the RTX 2080. The standard 2080 S draws north of 150W but the mobile variant is said to be extremely power efficient with a TGP of 80W (Max-Q).
  • NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER (N18E-G2R): Like the RTX 2080 Super, the 2070 S Max-Q will also have a TGP of 80W with 8GB of GDDR6 memory.
  • NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER (N18E-G1R): The RTX 2060 Super is rumored (surprisingly) to have the same 80W TGP and 8GB of GDDR6 VRAM as the higher-end mobile RTX cards. You can expect a 256-bit bus and a lower core count compared to the 2070 S and 2080 S.
  • Then there are two GTX 16 series Supers:
  • N18P-G62
  • N18PP-G61
  • One of these is the GTX 1650 Super while the other (most likely) will be the 1660 Super. You can expect performance in line with the desktop variants, just slightly lower in the case of the Max-Q models.

I’m not sure if NVIDIA will be launching just the standard mobile versions of these GPUs or Max-Q or both. When AMD launches the Radeon RX 5500M and 5300M GPUs next year (at CES), it will have the process advantage which will directly translate into better temps and higher clocks. However, NVIDIA still has a pretty efficient GPU architecture despite being on an older node, should be able to compete with AMD’s 7nm Navi design.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!

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