GPUsNews

NVIDIA Expects to Make $400 Million From CMP Mining GPUs in Q2 2021, Up from $155 Million in Q1

During NVIDIA’s Q1 earnings call, company CFO Colette Kress provided some details on the revenue generated by the sales of the CMP lineup (mining-centric GPUs). CMP, short for Cryptocurrency Mining Processors were launched (re-launched) by the company to satiate the growing demand of industrial cryptominers. According to NVIDIA, these parts don’t affect the supply of GeForce gaming products, but the truth is more complicated than that.

30X40X50X90X
ArchitectureTuring (TU116)Turing (TU106)Turing (TU104)Ampere (GA102)
Ethereum Hash Rate26 MH/s36 MH/s45 MH/s86 MH/s
Rated Power125 W185 W250 W320 W
Power Connectors1x 8-pin1x 8-pin2x 8-pin2x 8-pin
Memory Size6GB8GB10GB10GB
Starting AvailabilityQ1Q1Q2Q2
The CMP lineup is based on the Turing and Ampere dies

In reality, this simply prevents the flooding of second-hand GeForce GPUs into channel inventory after the mining boom ends. The CMP cards which lack display adapters can’t be sold to gamers after use and as such, largely end up in landfills as eWaste. The end result is that there won’t be a “crypto-hangover” for NVIDIA like last time where large quantities of GPUs ended up being unsold, thereby lowering the company’s revenue post the mining boom.

As per Kress, the CMP cards along with the LHR (low hash rate) graphics cards which come with an Ether mining block have been designed to allow more and more GeForce GPUs to reach gamers. Regardless of how true that may be, the company generated $155 in Q1 from the sale of the CMP lineup. The same is expected to grow to a rather considerable $400 million by the second quarter of 2021. As always, the execs didn’t comment on the possible quantity of GeForce products sold to cryptominers.

Source

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Back to top button