CPUsGPUsNews

New Apple MacBooks w/ Up to 40 CPU Cores and 128 GPU Cores Coming Later this Year

According to a Bloomberg report, Apple is working on new MacBooks with custom in-house Arm-based chips with as many as 10 cores, eight high-performance, and two low-power cores. These will replace the older Intel-based designs that the company has been using for quite a while now. The Cupertino company is planning an overhaul of its entire Mac laptop lineup, including the MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, as well as its desktop line, namely the Mac Pro, iMac, and Mac mini.

The updated MacBook Pro laptops are expected to launch this summer with up to 10 CPU cores based on the same architecture as the M1 SoC. As already mentioned, eight of the cores will be the high-performance cluster while the remaining two will be based on the low-power design. As such, you can expect the new SoC to be at least twice as fast as the M1 in multi-threaded applications. On the GPU side, the shader count is also being buffed up, with a 16 core or 32 core variant.

For the lighter MacBook Air, Apple is planning a successor to the M1 with the same core count. Considering the timeline, it’s likely going to be a higher-clocked refresh based on the same 5nm EUV process. The graphics cores will also reportedly be increased to ten (from 7/8).

The memory is also getting a major increase, going from just 16GB to up to 64GB, in line with most workstation PCs. In the future, Apple is planning an even more powerful lineup of SoCs with up to 40 CPU cores. There will be a 20 core and a 40 core variant. The former will include 16 high-performance cores and four low-power cores while the latter will come with 32 high-performance cores and eight low-power cores. On the graphics side, the GPUs will pack an impressive 64 cores and up to 128-cores for the higher-end model.

Source

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

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