GamingGPUsNews

Necromunda: Hired Gun, Arcadegeddon to Get AMD FSR on 16th July, RE: VIII, Edge of Eternity, Baldur’s Gate 3, Far Cry 6, Myst, and More

AMD has announced in a blog post that its spatial upscaling technology, Super Resolution (FSR) will be coming to a slew of new titles including Necromunda: Hired Gun, Arcadegeddon, Edge of Eternity, Resident Evil Village, and more. Necromunda: Hired Gun and Arcadegeddon will be the first to get it on the 16th of July, followed by Edge of Eternity and Resident Evil Village the next week.

This will bring the total list of games with FSR support to 12, but that’s not all. In addition to these 12 titles, forty more developers are planning to integrate FSR into their games, the more notable examples being Asterigos, Baldur’s Gate 3, Far Cry 6, Farming Simulator 22, Forspoken, Myst, Swordsman Remake, and Vampire the Masquerade: Bloodhunt.

Necromunda: Hired Gun will be an especially noteworthy addition as it already supports DLSS 2.0, giving users the ability to compare the two upscaling techniques side-by-side.

FSR Support in Leading Game Engines

Starting today FSR will be available in both Unity and Unreal Engine.

  • Unity: AMD FidelityFX Super Resolution is available now in a special preview beta branch of Unity 2021.2 HDRP. You can learn more in the Unity section on the GPUOpen FSR page and see FSR in action in the Unity HDRP Spaceship demo video above showing that FSR delivers up to a 1.9x performance boost at 4K in “Performance” mode. [2]
  • Unreal Engine 4: From today, AMD FidelityFX Super Resolution will also be available on Unreal Engine 4! Head over to the Unreal Engine patches page for more information. The Unreal Engine Performance Guide has also been updated to talk about UE4 upscaling as well, including FSR upscaling. It’s worth noting that Unreal Engine 5 which is still in beta has already gotten the DLSS 2.0 patch. We’ll have to wait and see how long it takes for the Epic team to integrate FSR.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

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