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Metro Exodus Enhanced Edition Looks Better on the Xbox Series X Compared to the PS5: 1512p vs 1728p

Digital Foundry did a comparison of Metro Exodus Enhanced Edition on the PS5 and Xbox Series X, and while the level of detail on both consoles was roughly the same, the latter benefited from the extra compute units in its GPU, allowing for a higher resolution. The game uses dynamic resolution on both consoles, but the Series X maintains a higher pixel count, with the resolution fluctuating between 1512-1728p. The PS5, on the other hand, stays between 1296p to 1512p.

While this difference is too small to result in a tangible difference in quality, there is another problem that the PS5 suffers from. The colors are much darker than they should be, resulting in a loss of detail in darker areas. This appears to be a bug with HDR, rendering the game unplayable for some, as it can’t be fixed even by turning the brightness all the up to the highest level.

This is clearly visible in the shots above and below this block. In the above shot, the textures lose a fair bit of detail, while in the below shot the LOD is adversely affected.

The resolution advantage of the Series X is quite noticeable in the below shot with the rock texture. It looks like the resolution on the PS5 has tanked to the lower limit here while the Series X is still able to stay above 1600p.

Overall though, it’s very hard to spot any differences in terms of visual fidelity between the two consoles, despite the Series X featuring a higher resolution.

Interestingly, the load times on the two consoles are the exact same. This makes the much faster SSD on the PS5 look obsolete. It’s unclear whether this is due to the internal compression algorithms used by the consoles or simply a result of the game not fully utilizing the I/O capabilities of the PS5.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

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