CPUs

Meet the XMG Clevo: A Laptop with a 12-Core Ryzen 9 3900 and NVIDIA GTX 1660 Ti and Upgrade Options

AMD launched it’s Ryzen 4000 “Renoir” APU lineup at CES yesterday. This will give Intel’s 10nm Ice Lake chips a run for their money. With twice the number of cores as the competition, the Ryzen 7 4800H and 4800HS are based on the 7nm Zen 2 design, meaning all the performance of the desktop Ryzen 3000 CPUs in a sub-50W envelope. That’s not all though. Some OEMs are looking to stuff AMD’s 12-core Ryzen 9 3900 into a laptop!

The XMG Clevo is one such device. It literally is a desktop in laptop form factor. You get a B450M micro motherboard paired with the 12-core Ryzen 9 3900 CPU and an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti. There’s 16GB of DDR4 3200MHz memory and two M/2 drives. This is still a prototype but considering that NVIDIA has been doing the same with their GPUs, it seems plausible.

Related: Testing Eco Mode on the AMD Ryzen 3000 CPUs: 95% Performance for 70% Power

The Ryzen 3000 CPUs built using the 7nm node from TSMC are extremely power efficient. In our testing, we found that the Ryzen 9 3900X stays just above 50W when using the Eco Power Saving mode. Best of all, the gaming performance is largely unaffected. And this is the 3900 (non-X), so it can certainly stay under the 45W power envelope. The temperatures are also quite manageable with today’s cooling solutions.

To top it all off, the laptop isn’t any bulkier than traditional Alienware devices from Dell. With a weight of 2.7Kg and a thickness of 3.2cm, it’s…manageable at the very least. Considering that the Ryzen 9 is actually not a power-hog like Intel’s Coffee Lake parts, I’m actually somewhat optimistic about battery-life and unplugged performance.

Furthermore considering that this uses a B450 board, it’s possible that you may be able to upgrade it when the 4th Gen Ryzen 4000 CPUs (Renoir) come out later this year. We already know that AMD is going to continue supporting the AM4 socket for yet another generation.

We’ll dig around for more surprises. Stay tuned!

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Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!

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