Gaming

Internal Deal Between Intel-NVIDIA Blocked AMD Renoir Laptops with RTX 2070 and Above [Unverified]

According to a report from the Polish website, PurePC, Intel and NVIDIA had an internal agreement that prevented AMD’s partners from pairing the Renoir APUs with a GeForce RTX 2070 and above. Despite the fact that the Ryzen 7 4800H and 4900H were quite a bit faster than Intel’s Comet Lake-H offerings, not a single device came with a higher-end Turing or Turing refresh GPU.

We haven’t been able to verify this info just yet, so take it with a grain of salt, but here’s what PurePC had to say:

Intel and NVIDIA had an agreement signed last year, under which it was not possible to prepare laptop configurations with AMD Ryzen 4000 processors and graphics cards at the GeForce RTX 2070 level and above.

PurePC

Although many sources claimed that the limited number of PCIe 3.0 lanes (x8) was one of the reasons that OEMs didn’t pair the Ryzen 4000 APUs with NVIDIA’s higher-end RTX 20 series GPU, PurePC believes that was simply an excuse, a smokescreen rather than the actual reason.

The Polish outlet claims in its latest post that one of the OEMs secretly admitted that the real reason behind the lack of Renoir notebooks with higher-end GPUs was an internal agreement between NVIDIA and Intel. This deal prevented OEMs from pairing the Ryzen 4000 processors with the GeForce RTX 2070 and above, limiting them to Intel’s Comet Lake-H lineup, essentially preventing AMD from entering the enthusiast-range gaming laptop market.

With the Ryzen 5000 mobile processors (Cezanne), multiple OEMs, most notably ASUS and Lenovo have opted out of this agreement and have already decided to pair the new AMD chips with the top-end Ampere GPUs from NVIDIA. However, Dell and Razer are two laptop-makers who continue to stick with Intel. We’ll be able to verify this story only when the new Cezanne-based notebooks are launched and we can compare the offerings of different OEMs.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to.Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!
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