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Intel Tiger Lake-H Spotted on EEC Portal; Possible 2021 Launch

A while back, (for the first time) evidence of the Intel Tiger Lake-H lineup surfaced in the form of an official board layout. Those are, however, usually not considered definitive proof of an upcoming product stack. Today though, the ECC Portal sprung up a surprise when a Tiger Lake-H listing was spotted along with an upgrade kit. That still doesn’t mean that we’ll be seeing Tiger Lake-H in gaming laptops anytime soon. All this indicates is that in the distant future, Intel is indeed planning a 10nm++ launch for high-performance laptops.

Intel launched the Ice Lake-U and Y lineups last year, the first commercially available 10nm+ CPUs from the company. The laptops featuring these chips, however, are still not available in some regions like the Asia-Pacific. Tiger Lake-U is expected to hit retail sometime later this year, and will hopefully address the supply issues.

Tiger Lake isn’t a mere refresh of Ice Lake (something we’ve gotten used to). It’ll be based on the enhanced 10nm++ node and the Willow Cove core architecture. Furthermore, it’ll also feature the Gen 12 Xe architecture with as many as 96EUs. That’s 50% more than Ice Lake. As such, you can expect the onboard graphics of these CPUs to be on par with contemporary mobile dGPUs.

Ice lake is expected to launch for the server market, but the consumer space will have to make do with Comet Lake-S and H lineups, also based on the 14nm Skylake core. Alder Lake-S is rumored to be the first 10nm part for the desktop space with an expected launch in 2022-23. Before ADL-S, we’ll be getting Rocket Lake-S. Although based on the 14nm process as well, sources say that it’ll feature a backport of the Willow Cove core. While that is mere speculation at this point, we really hope it’s more than just a rebrand.

Source
ECC

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!

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