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Intel Sapphire Rapids-SP to Feature up to 56 and 44 Core CPUs w/ TDP of 350W and 270W, Respectively

Intel just launched its first 10nm server CPUs in the form of the Ice Lake-SP lineup with up to forty cores, 64 PCIe lanes, and octa-channel DDR4-3200 memory support. Unfortunately, it’s too little, too late. Most reviewers called the new processors inadequate compared to the competition, with applications of AVX512 being very limited. We’ll just have to wait and see what the next-gen lineup, Sapphire Rapids has in store for Data Centers.

Sapphire Rapids will be based on Intel’s 10nm SuperFin process node and the Golden Cove core architecture, with a peak core count of as much as 56 cores/108 threads. Considering that GC is going to be up to 25% faster than Sunny Cove, we can expect Sapphire Rapids to outright beat AMD’s Epyc Milan across most workloads, both single-threaded and multi-threaded. The inclusion of DDR5 memory support, PCIe 5.0, CXL 1.1, and on-package HBM2E memory should allow for substantial improvements over the preceding generation.

As per the above-included leak, SPR will include up to 56 cores with a TDP of 350W. There will also be 44 core and 48 core variants considering that we’re still looking at a monolithic design, with prices once again expected to go down across the board. The 44 core SKU will come with a TDP of 270W and will be one of the primary products of the Sapphire Rapids lineups with the 24 core part with a TDP of 224W being designated as “low volume”.

However, Intel won’t get much time before AMD launches its Epyc Genoa chips based on the 5nm Zen 4 core with up to 96 cores/188 threads and possible support for AVX512 vectors. Genoa is expected to come with a new SP5 socket with 6096 pins (LGA-6096), 12-channel DDR5-5200 memory, and as many as 128 PCIe 5.0 lanes per node, once again one-upping Intel in terms of sheer I/O capabilities and compute performance.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

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