CPUsNews

Intel Has Already Shipped 200,000 Units of the Newly Launched Ice Lake-SP Processors

Intel launched its 3rd Gen Xeon scalable processors, codenamed Ice Lake-SP the other day. This marks the launch of the first 10nm volume lineup from the company. Keep in mind that, unlike Tiger Lake, these CPUs are based on the older Sunny Cove design on the 10nm+ node rather than the SuperFin design. Regardless, the company revealed that it has already shipped over 200,000 units of the Xeon Ice Lake-SP to key clients even before release. These are Intel’s primary customers that contribute to the lion’s share of its revenue, and likely paid a special price for their parts.

We intend to use our own OEM advantages to maximize the market’s demand for third-generation products. All major cloud service providers plan to deploy Ice Lake services, and they will launch such services for the first time in April. We have more than 50. Excellent OEM and ODM are expected to introduce more than 250 Ice Lake-based designs to the market.

Lisa Spelman, VP of Xeon Division at Intel

The VP of Intel’s Xeon and Storage Division, Lisa Spelman said that the company is expecting more than 250 Ice Lake-SP based designs in the coming months from various OEMs and ODMs, with over 50 cloud providers slated to adopt the 10nm lineup. She further stated that mass production of the 3rd Gen Xeon Scalable processors began in the last quarter of 2020, and yields have been improving in the first quarter of 2021.

The shipment of Xeon processors is guaranteed, especially for data centers. We are making every effort to increase production capacity, and the actual increase is higher than planned.

Wang Rui, VP and GM of Intel China

The Vice President and General Manager of Intel China, Wang Rui said that the existing semiconductor shortage shouldn’t impact the supply of the new processors. He went as far as to guarantee Xeon CPUs for data centers.

Source

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

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