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Intel Core i7-10750H Cinebench Benchmark Leaked: >10% Faster than the 9750H

It appears that Intel’s position in the mobile PC market will go from dominant to precarious this year. While the low-power Ice Lake-U and Y CPUs are a decent up from the Whiskey Lake parts, the Comet Lake offerings, more specifically the Comet Lake-H don’t bring anything new to the table. So much so that the high-performance H lineup is almost identical to the succeeding Coffee Lake-R. The same core counts, threads and cache sizes, built on the same process and architecture. The only difference will be the core clocks. However, considering that this is a mobile platform, the in-game clocks will vary depending on the thermal solution, power draw and operating temperatures.

A leaked Cinebench benchmark of the Core i7-10750H further iterates this. The lower-end parts (i3 and i5) might see decent gains due to better thermals but the hex-core 10750H and the 10980HK will most likely suffer from severe throttling in most mainstream laptops, resulting in worse overall performance:

Cinebench is one of those benchmarks that don’t benefit all that much from higher core clocks, but these results are straight-up ridiculous. The single-core performance is nearly identical while the multi-core benchmark shows an improvement of less than 10%.

I am beginning to believe that the 10th Gen Comet Lake-H processors might indeed perform worse than their preceding Coffee Lake-R parts, if not the same. Read more here:

Intel’s 10th Gen Core i9-10980HK Mobile CPU Might be Slower than its 9th Gen Predecessor

10th Gen Intel Comet Lake-H Gaming Laptop Prices Surface

The AMD Ryzen 7 4800H will be at least 10% faster than the Intel Core i7-10750H

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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