CPUsNews

Intel Announces 32 New CPUs Under the 10th Gen Comet Lake-S Family: Up to 10 Cores @ 5.3GHz

Intel yesterday announced its 10th Gen Comet Lake-S processors, offering up to 10 cores with a single-boost clock of 5.3GHz. The latest 14nm family consists of a whopping 32 chips, including the low-power T series, the F series lacking iGPUs, plus the dual-core Pentium and Celeron parts. At the top of the stack, you’ve got the Core i9-10900K with 10 cores and 20 threads and a maximum thermal velocity boost of 5.3GHz (single-core). The all-core boost is an impressive 4.9GHz, accompanied by a PL2 of 250W and 56s Tau.

As already reported multiple times before, the 10th Gen desktop lineup is mostly a rebrand of the 9th Gen chips, with hyperthreading enabled across the board. The reduced pricing is the key attraction of the new processors. You’re essentially getting twice as many threads at the same price or lower, while the ten-core flagship, the Core i9-10900K is a brand new chip with an all-core boost of nearly 5GHz, and a single core max of 5.3GHz.

The 10900K is priced at $488 while the 10900KF is $16 cheaper at $472. The non-K i9-10900 is placed in the sub-$450 market, with an MSRP of $439, nearly the same as AMD’s Ryzen 9 3900X.

Climbing down the ladder, we have the Core i7-10700K and the 10700, with MSRPs of $374 and $323, respectively. This is marginally higher than the Ryzen 7 3700X which is priced @ $299 with most retailers.

Further below, you have the Core i5s and i3s, with 6C/12T and 4C/8T, respectively. The cheapest hex-core part, the Core i5-10400F goes for $157, a notch below the $186 Ryzen 5 3600. The 10500 and 10600 are priced at $192 and $213, respectively, with the boost clock being the only difference between the two. Among the unlocked variants, the 10600KF costs $237 while the 10600K has an MSRP of $262. In comparison, the Ryzen 5 3600X has come down to just $205.

Lastly, the Core i3s with four cores and eight threads cost around $20-30 more than the recently announced Ryzen 3 3100 and 3300X parts. The 10320 with a boost frequency of 4.6GHz costs $154 while the 10300 goes for $143. Scraping the barrel bottom, the Core i3-10100 is priced at $122 with a boost clock of 4.3GHz.

SKUCores / ThreadsBase ClockAll Core TurboTh. Velocity BoostTDPMSRP
Core i9-10900K 10C/20T 3.7 GHz 4.9 GHz 5.3GHz 125W $488
Core i9-10900KF 10C/20T 3.7 GHz 4.9 GHz 5.3GHz 125W $472
Core i9-10900 10C/20T 2.8 GHz 4.6 GHz 5.2GHz 65W $439
Core i9-10900F 10C/20T 2.8 GHz 4.6 GHz 5.2GHz 65W $422
Core i9-10900T 10C/20T 1.9 GHz 3.7 GHzNA 35W $439
Core i7-10700K 8C/16T 3.8 GHz 4.7 GHzNA 125W $374
Core i7-10700KF 8C/16T 3.8 GHz 4.7 GHzNA 125W $349
Core i7-10700 8C/16T 2.9 GHz 4.6 GHzNA 65W $323
Core i7-10700F 8C/16T 2.9 GHz 4.6 GHzNA 65W $298
Core i7-10700T 8C/16T 2.0 GHz 3.7 GHzNA 35W $325
Core i5-10600K 6C/12T 4.1 GHz 4.5 GHzNA 125W $262
Core i5-10600KF 6C/12T 4.1 GHz 4.5 GHzNA 125W $237
Core i5-10600 6C/12T 3.3 GHz 4.4 GHzNA 65W $213
Core i5-10600T 6C/12T 2.4 GHz 3.7 GHzNA 35W $213
Core i5-10500 6C/12T 3.1 GHz 4.2 GHzNA 65W $192
Core i5-10500T 6C/12T 2.3 GHz 3.5 GHzNA 35W $192
Core i5-10400 6C/12T 2.9 GHz 4.0 GHzNA 65W $182
Core i5-10400F 6C/12T 2.9 GHz 4.0 GHzNA 65W $157
Core i5-10400T 6C/12T 2.0 GHz 3.2 GHzNA 35W $182
Core i3-10320 4C/8T 3.8 GHz 4.4 GHzNA 65W $154
Core i3-10300 4C/8T 3.7 GHz 4.2 GHzNA 65W $143
Core i3-10300T 4C/8T 3.0 GHz 3.7 GHzNA 35W $143
Core i3-10100 4C/8T 3.6 GHz 4.1 GHzNA 65W $122
Core i3-10100T 4C/8T 3.0 GHz 3.5 GHzNA 35W $122
Pentium G-6600 2C/4T 4.2 GHzNANA 58W $86
Pentium G-6500 2C/4T 4.1 GHzNANA 58W $75
Pentium G-6500T 2C/4T 3.5 GHzNANA 35W $75
Pentium G-6400 2C/4T 4.0 GHzNANA 58W $64
Pentium G-6400T 2C/4T 3.4 GHzNANA 35W $64
Celeron G-5920 2C/2T 3.5 GHzNANA 58W $52
Celeron G-5900 2C/2T 3.4 GHzNANA 58W $42
Celeron G-5900T 2C/2T 3.2 GHzNANA 35W $42

The review embargo for the newly announced 10th Gen chips is expected to lift by the end of May, so we’ll have to wait a bit more to see how the Comet Lake parts stack up against the existing Ryzen 3000 offerings.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!
Back to top button