CPUsNews

Intel 7nm Granite Rapids CPUs Expected in H1 2023, AMD 5nm Epyc Genoa in Q2 2022

Both Intel and AMD are expected to launch their next-gen server CPUs, Ice Lake-SP and Epyc Milan, respectively in the first quarter of 2021. In line with these announcements, suppliers of coolers and PCBs in Taiwan are expecting to see increased demand in the server sector.

Intel is expected to launch server CPUs with core counts higher than any previous generation (up to 32 cores for ICL-SP and 64 for ICL-AP). This means that the power consumption and therefore, heat dissipation per node will be notably higher than previous generations.

AMD, while not increasing the core counts this time around, is also aiming for boost clocks up to 400MHz higher than Rome which directly translates into higher power consumption and heat dissipation. As such, cooling solution providers are expecting robust demand in the first half of 2021.

Fujikura, an Intel partner, is expected to see significantly higher demand and will be working with Taiwan-based electroplating service provider, Superior Plating Technology to design its cooling products. For the first time in five years, Superior is expected to produce a profit, thanks to orders from Apple (USB Type-C connectors), increased HDD demand, and the aforementioned growth in the server sector.

As per sources, Intel is planning to follow up the Ice Lake-SP launch with Sapphire Rapids (10nm SuperFin Enhanced) in the first quarter of 2022, followed by the first 7nm based lineup, Granite Rapids-SP in the first half of 2023, and Diamond Rapids (7nm enhanced) in 2024.

On AMD’s side, the 5nm (EUV) based Epyc Genoa CPUs are slated to launch in the second quarter of 2022, the same time as Sapphire Rapids, essentially giving a full node advantage for roughly a year.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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