CPUsNews

Intel 12th Gen Alder lake to Feature 10nm 8+8 Hybrid Core Config w/ 14nm Gen12 Xe GPU

Intel’s 12th Gen Alder Lake CPUs seem all set to use a hybrid core configuration, following the recent launch of Lakefield. This means a high-performance “Big core” cluster paired with a low power “small core” cluster similar to how ARM chips are designed. While there’s certainly an advantage of going with this layout in the mobile space, I’m not quite sure what made Intel opt for it in the desktop segment.

Regardless, there are rumored to be three Alder Lake families in the pipeline. These are Alder lake-S (the desktop parts), Alder lake-P (Atom server chips), and lastly Alder Lake-M (mobile?). As per data shared by Sharklake on the PTT Chinese forums, the core configurations of these different processors are as follows:

  • Alder Lake-S
    • 8 Big Cores + 8 Small Cores + GT1 GPU
    • 6 Big Cores + 0 Small Cores + GT1 GPU
  • Alder Lake-P
    • 2 Big Cores + 8 Small Cores + GT2 GPU
    • 6 Big Cores + 8 Small Cores + GT2 GPU
  • Alder Lake-M
    • 2 Big Cores + 8 Small Cores + GT2 GPU

Earlier, a similar table showing the core configurations of the 12th Gen desktop lineup along with the TDPs and sockets had surfaced:

It seems that the new LGA1200 platform that debuted with Comet Lake will be short-lived with support for only two generations. AMD, on the other hand, has promised to support the AM4 socket for the entire 4 generations of Ryzen processors.

The second part of the leak indicates that Alder Lazke might consist of a 10nm CPU and a 14nm GPU. The 11th Gen Rocket Lake-S CPUs are going to be fabbed on 14nm as well, albeit they’ll feature the Willow Cove core along with the Gen12 Xe graphics backported from 10nm. It’s very likely that the same iGPU will retained on Alder Lake.

Keep in mind that Alder Lake is still more than two years away from launch, so much of this might change. We’ll keep you posted as we hear more.

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Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!
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