CPUsNews

Intel 12th Gen Alder Lake-S CPUs to Support DDR5 Memory

Intel will reportedly move to DDR5 memory starting with its 12th Gen Alder Lake-S desktop CPUs, becoming the first consumer processor lineup to adopt the new memory standard (that we know of). While AMD’s Zen 4 CPUs are also expected to leverage the newer memory, Team Red hasn’t said anything regarding it till now, nor have seen any leaks pointing to the same.

Updated RKL-S DDR4 2DPC SBS configuration
Added ADL-S DDR5 UDIMM 1DPC B2B ECC and Non-ECC configuration
Added ADL-S DDR5 UDIMM 2DPC B2B ECC and Non-ECC configuration
Updated TGL-H DDR4 T3/12L WP ECC 1DPC configuration
Added TGL-H DDR4 MD 1Rx16 configuration

Meanwhile, the leak from Videocardz suggests that both the 11th Gen Rocket Lake-S (desktop) as well the Tiger Lake-H (45W laptop) CPUs will continue to use DDR4 memory. The former is expected to land in early 2021 while the latter will likely launch a few months later.

Rocket Lake-S will continue to use the 14nm process but at the same time introduce a new core architecture, succeeding Skylake in the desktop market. Tiger Lake-H, on the other hand, will be based on Intel’s 10nm+++ node, featuring the Willow Cove core architecture paired with Gen12 Xe graphics. It is expected to be significantly faster than existing Comet Lake-H parts both in terms of CPU as well as GPU performance.

Lastly, Alder Lake-S will be Intel’s first 10nm based desktop lineup. It’ll use the newer LGA1700 socket which will likely bring support for not only DDR5 but PCIe 5.0 as well. Alder Lake is also going to be Intel’s first mainstream platform to leverage the Big-little design, consisting of both high-performance Sunny/Willow Cove cores as well as the low-power Tremont cores (similar to Lakefield). Whether this approach will be successful or not remains to be seen.

Source

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to.Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!

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