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Intel 12th Gen Alder Lake Processors Reportedly Launching in Mid-November

Intel will be launching its 12th Gen Alder Lake processors for desktop PCs and the DIY market in mid to late November. This was reported by WCCFTech earlier today. According to the outlet, Team Blue will hold a pre-launch event on the 27th/28th of October (one of those “Innovation” streams), revealing 1st party benchmarks, specifications, and yes, the prices. 

The hard launch will follow nearly a month later, with both the 12th Gen K-series processors and the Z690 motherboards available in retail on the 19th of November. The non-K, F, and KF stacks will likely be rolled out through Q2, followed by the mobile lineup.

Intel’s CPU core roadmap now includes a new Alder Lake performance hybrid architecture that will combine Golden Cove and Gracemont cores in one highly efficient product arriving in 2021. At Architecture Day in August 2020, Intel Chief Architect Raja Koduri, Intel fellows and architects provided details on the progress Intel is making. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Interestingly, DDR5-4800 support will be limited to high-end Z690 boards while the budget and lower-end offerings (H670, B650, H610) will retain DDR4-3200 native support. Alder Lake will once again introduce a new socket in the form of LGA1700, so users running Comet Lake or Rocket Lake on LGA1200 boards will need to buy everything from scratch.

Alder Lake will be Intel’s first mainstream hybrid core architecture. There are a lot of firsts with this one. New core architectures on both fronts, new graphics architecture, new process node, new memory (at least on the higher-end SKUs), and of course, a new platform. In case you’re curious about the Alder Lake lineup or the architecture powering it, check out the following posts:

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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