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Intel 11th Gen Core i7-11700 QS vs AMD Ryzen 7 5800X Gaming Benchmarks Surface

A full-fledged review of the Intel Core i7-11700 has surfaced on YouTube. While we can’t say for sure whether the review itself is legit or not, the figures are definitely interesting. The chip tested is a qualification sample that is often sent out to reviewers, so the final retail performance shouldn’t be that different. Without any further ado, let’s have a look at the gaming performance of the Core i7-11700 and compare it to the Ryzen 7 5800X:

Before I say something else, let me make a few things clear. There’s a good chance that this review is fake or misleading. The primary reason being that the data is pretty scant. Only the averages are included while the lows are missing. Furthermore, these are cherry-picked titles, and only the first two scale well with core counts. Horizon Zero Dawn and Dirt 5 show moderate to poor scaling over four cores and almost no increase upon going from a hex to octa-core CPU. As such, these results can’t be taken at face value.

The content creation benchmarks produce expected results, with the Core i7-11700 being drastically faster than its predecessor in single-threaded workloads but still a fair bit slower than the Ryzen 7 5800X across all four tests. The deltas between the 10th and 11th Gen parts are quite marginal in most multi-threaded content creation workloads, with the 11700 being just over 10% faster than the 10700. The Rocket Lake-S chip performs favorably in Blender, being just a couple of seconds slower than the 5800X and nearly an entire minute faster than the 10700.

Looking at these benchmarks, one thing is clear. The Core i7-11700 and the 11700K will mostly be slower than the AMD Ryzen 7 5800X across most workloads including 1080p gaming. It’s the Core i9-11900K which will hold the gaming crown next, at least for a few months, while its lower-end siblings will be more attractive on a price-performance basis.

Source

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

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