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Intel 10nm SF Alder Lake Mobile CPUs to Feature 5 to 16 Cores: 5W to 55W

Intel’s 10nm Alder Lake mobile roadmap has surfaced, showing a significant restructuring of the company’s low-power product stack. No longer will the chips be divided into just U, Y, and H series. Instead, we’re looking at six different segments across the mobile segment:

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The lowest-end 5-7W SKUs meant for tablets and convertibles will be named M5 and include just two models. Both will come with one big “Golden Cove” core and four little “Grace Mont” cores, paired with 64/ 48 EU integrated Gen12 graphics. Moving up the ladder, there’s the 9-15W U9 stack which will feature 3-4 SKUs, with up to two GC cores and eight low-power GM cores, and up to 96 EU iGPUs. The lowest-end part will have the same spec as the M5 chips, with one GC and four GM cores, along with 48 EUs on the GPU. Both the M5 and U9 lineups will come in the M package.

Further up, there are the U15 and U28 lineups. These are essentially the equivalent of the U series mobile processors we’re used to seeing. The former will have a TDP of 15W while the latter will have a stock power draw of up to 28W, similar to Tiger Lake-U. U15 will have a similar core configuration as U9, but U28 will upgrade the high-performance (Golden Cove) core count to six (from just two on U9 and U15), resulting in a total core count of up to 14. All three SKUs come with the top-end 96EU Gen12 Xe iGPU.

Then, we have the H45 lineup with a thermal design target of 45W. These are the standard H-series gaming CPUs which are essentially the same as U28 in everything except the clocks and the TDP. Lastly, there’s the H55 series which includes the ultra-high-end SKUs, the successors to the Core i9-10980HK, and the 11980HK which will feature boost clocks of up to 5GHz and sixteen cores, 8 GC and 8GM. These are technically desktop-grade S series CPUs with a reduced TDP of 55W and a 32EU iGPU.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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