GPUsNews

Graphics Card Prices have Started Returning to Normal as Cryptomining Boom Fades

As the value of Bitcoin and Ethereum continue to fall, graphics card prices have started normalizing, although it’ll still take a while for them to return to the MSRP. Budget to high-end GPUs such as the RX 6800 and RTX 3070 saw their prices drop by as much as 36%, falling from €1,500 down to around €1,000. The top-end SKUs also saw similar trends in their market prices. The RTX 3080 dropped from over €2,200 to €1,499, while the 6800 XT approached the price of its elder Navi 21 sibling.

RX 6700 XTRX 6800RX 6800 XTRX 6900 XTRTX 3060RTX 3060 TiRTX 3070RTX 3080RTX 3090
MSRP€479€579€649€999€329€419€519€719€1,549
Minimum price May 17th€929 €1,499€1,499€1,699€949€1,499€2,299
Minimum price June 17th€799€1,049€1,249€1,589€639€999€999€1,499€2,199
Available May 17th9339543
Available June 17th206813242262418

The lower-end parts such as the RTX 3060 and RX 6700 XT are now priced just above the €500 mark, still making them difficult to recommend despite being aimed at the budget audience. In addition to the prices, the number of units available across retails in Europe and the US have improved as well. Compared to May 2021, June 21 saw vastly better availability especially in the higher-end segment, with the RTX 3070 and 3080 seeing an increase of 8x in units compared to the same day the previous month.

AMD’s stocks were less impressive, albeit still a marked improvement compared to the previous month. The Radeon RX 6700 XT got the most attention with close to 20 units being in stock on the 17th of June (compared to just 9 in May). The RX 6800 and 6800 XT still failed to see double-digit availability, while the RX 6900 XT saw a marginal improvement coming in second next to the 6700 XT.

Ether is at its lowest price since April

Note: The above prices are for the 17th of June. If you look at today’s prices, they’re slightly higher and stocks are also worse off.

Via: ComputerBase

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

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