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Gigabyte Delisted from Major Chinese Retailers After Calling “Made in China” Products Low Quality

Gigabyte has found itself in a controversy after calling China-made products inferior, claiming that electronics made in Taiwan (its own products) demand a much higher manufacturing quality instead. This little snippet was picked up by the Communist Youth League of China (CYLC) on Tuesday and then shared on Weibo.

The above image posted on Weibo shows Gigabyte disparaging the quality of products made in China while calling its own hardware made in Taiwan high quality. The company takes a shot at its competitors who have factories based in China, calling them low-cost and a lower-quality approach (by having Chinese OEMs manufacture their products).

Unsurprisingly, this post went viral in China with over 6,000 retweets and 5,000+ comments, with most users criticizing the marketing claim. Gigabyte released an apology on Weibo later on, but the damage was already done:

We sincerely apologize for the discomfort this has caused everyone, and we thank the majority of gamers and users for their concern for our company.

Gigabyte has been doing business in the Chinese mainland for more than 20 years, and will deeply review the inappropriate comments and make corrective actions to comply with the national principles.

Gigabyte will strengthen internal management and training to ensure that all employees are aware of the problem and pay attention to it.

Gigabyte PR

Multiple prominent Chinese retailers, including JD.com, have delisted Gigabyte products from their online stores. Considering that China is one of the largest markets in the world, this is definitely going to cost Gigabyte a fair bit of revenue.

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Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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