CPUsNews

Expect Arm powered NVIDIA CPUs Soon

With NVIDIA’s acquisition of Arm, it won’t be long before the former starts making CPUs with the green label. This was hinted by the company CEO, Jensen Huang while talking to reporters. He didn’t say that NVIDIA will be taking on AMD and Intel in the CPU market, rather in line with the Arm Eco-system, it’ll be designing core architectures and licensing it to clients. While Arm already has a vast clientele in the mobile market, it’s pretty much non-existent in the server and Data Center markets.

Now with our backing and Arm’s serious backing, the world can stand on that foundation and realize that they can build server CPUs. Now, some people would like to license the cores and build a CPU themselves. Some people may decide to license the cores and ask us to build those CPUs or modify ours.

It is not possible for one company to build every single version of them, but we will have the entire network of partners around Arm that can take the architectures we come up with and depending on what’s best for them, whether licensing the core, having a semi-custom chip made, or having a chip that we made, any of those options are available. Any of those options are available, we’re open for business and we would like the ecosystem to be as rich as possible, with as many options as possible.

TNP

NVIDIA already has a strong foothold in the Data Center business with its GPU accelerators, and with that expertise in hand, should be able to find a place for Arm-based CPU designs as well. All-in-one solutions featuring Arm Cortex and GeForce IP should help kickstart this movement, and with enough marketing and “encouragement” we should see ample adoption in the next 5-10 years.

He further explained that NVIDIA won’t be changing how Arm operates and clients will be free to take the cortex designs and customize them as per their needs. Of course, each client will require a license to use and modify the stock core architecture which will significantly add to NVIDIA’s overall earnings.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!

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