Memory and StorageNews

DDR5 Memory Kits Going for $2,500 on eBay as Shortages Prompt Scalping

As with most hardware, the shortage of DDR5 memory has resulted in scalping with some users selling used kits for over $2,000. Earlier, it was reported that the scarcity of PMIC chips has caused a severe shortage of DDR5 memory modules across most etailers. While neither Amazon nor Newegg has any listings of DDR5 memory, plenty of auctions have popped up on eBay, selling the kits for 5-10x more than the MSRP.

Recently, the supply of DDR5 memory has hit a low point, with both Amazon and Newegg seeing severe shortages across the board. Neither retailer has any DDR5 modules presently available (at the time of writing), with all existing listings being out of stock. It’s unclear how long the drought will last, but you can be sure that things won’t be changing in the next few months.

DDR5 Memory Remains Out of Stock Across Most Retailers as Prices Soar
Via: eBay

The shortages are so acute that even scalpers aren’t able to find many DDR5 kits to sell. At the time of writing, there are around 20-25 DDR5 listings on eBay (with inflated prices). Furthermore, the memory scalping season appears to be waning. The store’s Terapeak tool shows that the highest average price for DDR5 memory was recorded on the 21st of November at a whopping $2,500. Since then, the average selling price on eBay has dropped to under $1,000 as more and more listings. go live.

Regardless, going by the whispers on the streets, it looks like it’ll be a while before DDR5 memory prices stabilize (think early 2022). The lack of DDR5 memory is also hurting the sales of Intel’s 12th Gen Alder Lake-S processors. AMD’s Ryzen 5000 CPUs continue to lead in most regions despite falling behind their new rivals in most gaming and single-threaded workloads.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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