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China Processor Market Share: AMD Approaches 30% Mobile CPU Share, NVIDIA Leads in GPU Segments

The Chinese market is easily the most important in Asia-Pacific and one of the largest worldwide. However, the rigid regulations and specific user requirements make it hard to penetrate. Both AMD and Intel have released several products specifically tailored to the needs of the Chinese market. Some of the more notable examples include the Ryzen 5 3500/3500X, Radeon RX 580 2048SP, and the Ryzen 4000 series desktop APUs which were available in the Chinese DIY market from day 1. Therefore, as you may have surmised, the Chinese market follows its own set of rules both in terms of product popularity and supply. Let’s have a look at some of the most popular graphics cards and mobile CPUs in China in the third quarter of 2021:

Things are largely unchanged in the desktop DIY market, with Intel holding onto more than 75% of the share. AMD has been chipping away at that fat pie, but the recent focus on the mobile and server segments has put a stop to that. The notebook market, however, saw AMD inch closer to the 30% mark. These figures fall in line with the Steam Hardware Survey statistics.

In the graphics card segment, NVIDIA reigned supreme. All the top ten most popular spots were held by GeForce GPUs, with a healthy mix of RTX 30 series, RTX 20 series, GTX 16 series, and even a few GTX 10 series GPUs. The top spot (perhaps for the first time) was held by an RTX GPU, the RTX 3060, followed by the (still going strong) GTX 1650, and the RTX 3050 Ti. All three are notebook SKUs, highlighting the stagnation in the desktop graphics card market.

Finally, a look at the AIC market. Colorful was the most popular GPU vendor in China (~25% market share), followed by ASUS (18.5%), Gigabyte (11.44%), MSI, Zotac, and Sapphire.

Source: 1, 2

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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