GamingNews

China (300M) has Nearly 4x as Many PC Gamers as the US (80M), India Twice as Much (140M)

There are over 3 billion video gamers in the world as of August 2020, with the bulk of the audience shifting towards the East, most notably China and India. As per DFC intelligence, the mobile gaming market is the fastest-growing segment in the gaming industry, showing remarkable momentum in Asia.

Asia unsurprisingly accounts for more than half of all mobile gamers in the world, followed by Europe at 17%. In comparison, North America is responsible for just 6%. The recent rise of Chinese smartphone manufacturers and the surge in 4G compatible mobile devices have greatly helped in feeding this market. Many popular competitive multiplayer games like Call of Duty, Fortnite, and PUBG have also made their way to the low-cost mobile market. Although these games are primarily free-to-play, the publishers earn massive profits from micro-transactions including loot-boxes and cosmetics.

The PC Gaming market shows similar trends, with China at the helm, boasting a massive audience of 300 million, nearly four times as much the US which has just 70-80 million PC gamers. India comes in second with nearly 150 million PC users, again, twice as much as the US. Russia comes a close second with around 120-130 million PC gamers. Finally, the US, Brazil, and Japan account for 80 million, 70 million, and 40 million PC gamers, respectively.

This explains why OEMs launch specific products just for the Chinese market. Some popular examples are the Ryzen 5 3500X and the Radeon RX 580:

Although console gamers contribute to just 8% of the total gaming audience, they have the highest per-user spending. Some key highlights from the report include:

  • Asia is the leading region for paying game consumers at 1.42 billion
  • Europe has 668 million paying game consumers
  • Latin America has 383 million paying game consumers
  • North America has 261 million paying game consumers
  • There are an estimated 1.5 billion PC game consumers.

Source

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!
Back to top button