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Back 4 Blood Beta PC DLSS 2.2 Comparisons: Near Perfect Upscaling

Coop zombie shooter, Left 4 Dead 2 is all set to get a sequel after more than a decade in the form of Back 4 Blood, a fitting name considering the popularity of the franchise. The open beta for the same concluded a few days back with plenty of participation from the PC gaming community. In this post, we have a look at the DLSS implementation in the game. Back 4 Blood features the latest variant of DLSS (2.2.x), and as such is a good demonstration of how far the technology has come.

TAA vs DLSS Bal

In foresight, DLSS looks lighter than native (likely a result of the auto-exposure feature) but if you ignore that, the upscaling looks rather flawless. There’s no additional aliasing with DLSS balanced despite being significantly faster. At the same time, it’s worth noting that a fair amount of shading is lost with DLSS which erodes the quality of ambient occlusion and shadows, something we’ve seen in the past, although to a lesser extend.

TAA vs DLSS Bal

Vegetation and nets are usually the hardest to upscale without an apparent loss in detail, however, as you can see in the above shot, DLSS does it without any complications. As noted before though, ambient shadowing is adversely affected.

TAA vs DLSS Bal

Once again, as you can observe, DLSS preserves particle effects quite well, although the higher brightness makes it look a bit off. I expect this to be fixed in the final version.

TAA vs DLSS Bal

It’d be fair to say that DLSS has evolved into a near-perfect upscaling technology, fixing the downsides of traditional super-sampling anti-aliasing as well as temporal upsampling techniques both at once.

TAA vs DLSS Bal

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

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