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AMD’s Ryzen 4000 Laptops Hit Retail, R7 4800H #1 Mobility Chip in Cinebench, Blender and PassMark Benchmarks

AMD’s Ryzen 4000 powered notebooks finally hit retail today after a long wait, and oh boy, do they deliver. Just hours after launch, and it’s a bloodbath. The Ryzen 7 4800H has already started topping benchmark charts. This includes Cinebench R15, R20, Blender, 7-zip and the PassMark laptop benchmark database. The top-end Renoir chips crush the Intel’s Core i9-9980HK by a sound margin and leave the i7 parts far behind. Granted, the 10th Gen Comet Lake lineup is about to launch soon, but they won’t be more than 10-15% faster than their predecessors. And that’s per Intel’s official marketing materials. The actual gains will be in the ~10% range.

Cinebench R15

In CB R15, the Ryzen 7 4800H scores an insane 2,019 points in the multi-threaded test, beating the top-end Intel part, the i9-9980HK by more than 200 points. It even manages to level with sixteen-core Xeon chips.

CPUCinebench R20Blender BenchmarkMax Power Draw
i9-9980HK3,23920:5580W
R7-4800HS3,93320:4254W

In Cinebench R20 and Blender, the same result is repeated once again, with the 4800H drawing considerably less power than the 9980HK, all the while beating it by a notable margin. Here the Intel part peaks at 80W, but the Renoir offering stays under the 55W mark.

Lastly, there’s also the PassMark test, where the Ryzen 7 4800H establishes its supremacy by squishing its Intel rivals. It scores a meaty 18K while the Core i9-9980HK lags behind with around 16K points. The upcoming Core i7-10750H follows behind shortly with nearly the same score. The Core i7-9750H is left in the dust with just 11,600 points. That makes the 4800H nearly twice as fast as the 9th Gen i7.

Amid the lockdown, logistics is a problem. We sourced the R15 benchmark from Twitter while the R20 score from an associate. We’re working to get our review samples to the respective labs. Cheers!

Source
Twitter

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!

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