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AMD’s 5nm Zen 4 CPUs Won’t Hit Retail Before 2022: 5th Gen Warhol and Cezanne Based on 7nm+ in 2021

Sources from the industry have claimed that AMD is in no rush to migrate to the 5nm node ahead of schedule. Both the Milan and Vermeer processors based on the Zen 3 core architecture will leverage TSMC’s 7nm enhanced process to deliver IPC gains in excess of 15%, along with notable hikes in operating clocks. You might find this confusing given our last coverage on the topic. However, keep in mind that that report explicitly pointed out that the 5nm advanced node has been booked for AMD’s GPU orders, not CPUs, neither does it indicate when they’ll hit the market. AMD has essentially booked the space vacated by Huawei to ensure it gets ample 5nm chips by the time its next-to-next-gen chips land.

AMD’s Ryzen 4000 “Vermeer” desktop processors are expected to launch either by the end of 2020 or early 2021, while Milan is confirmed to be landing in the fourth quarter. As far as the RDNA 2 (Navi 2x) graphics cards are concerned, expect a launch sometime in fall, right before the next-gen consoles hit the market.

Furthermore, the successor to Vermeer, Warhol is expected to land sometime in 2021 and will be a refresh also based on the 7nm (enhanced) node, much like the Ryzen 2000 lineup. It’ll likely use the same Zen 3 core and performance gains will come from ramped up frequencies and a faster Infinity Fabric.

Cezanne, the successor to Renoir is also slated to come in 2021 for both laptops and OEM desktops. It will upgrade the CPU to Zen 3 while the integrated graphics will also see an RDNA based design. There have been conflicting reports from industry sources, so take the latter with a grain of salt.

The volume production for the 5nm Zen 4 CPUs should start in the second half of 2021, with a targeted launch in 2022. These include the consumer desktop 6th Gen Ryzen CPUs and the Epyc Genoa chips. The latter will get many I/O upgrades, ranging from PCIe 5.0, DDR5 memory, and increased lanes.

Source
Chinatimes

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!
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