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AMD’s 4700S is Actually Derived from Discarded PS5 “Ariel” SoCs: Still Faster than the Core i7-11700

We reported on the AMD 4700S APU a few days back. It was believed that the SoC was based on recycled Xbox Series X|S chips with failed GPUs. However, it turns out that the chip actually is the result of failed PS5 SoCs, codenamed Ariel. With eight cores and sixteen threads, the 4700S features the FSH Hub A77E, the same as the one used by the next-gen consoles. Interestingly, its I/O expansion capabilities are quite limited with support for a single PCIe 2.0 x4 slot, meaning it won’t be feasible to pair it with a high-end GPU.

The system includes three USB 3.1 ports that are believed to have been implemented using the SoC, as well as three USB 3.0, four USB 2.0, and two SATA ports, which are estimated to be F77E chipset bases. The system memory is arranged in a circular pattern on the back of the PCB with eight SK Hynix GDDR6 2GB modules with an effective speed of 14Gbps. There are no official figures regarding the core clocks or the memory bandwidth, but considering that this is a console SoC, you can expect midrange notebook speeds.

The processor looks pretty much identical to the PS5 SoC, with the disabled GPU and modified I/O being the primary differences, in addition to of course the form factor. The SKU itself performs more or less on par with the Ryzen 7 PRO 4750G, often times beating Intel’s 11th Gen Core i7-11700 (non-K) in both games and content creation (when paired with a nomial GPU such as the Radeon 550).

As you can see, the 4700S/550 combo is faster than the Core i7-11700 by a wide margin in most tests. This may be an unfair comparison, but the prices of the two setups should be roughly the same. It’ll be interesting to see whether the 4700S will be available worldwide or limited to certain regions.

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Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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