GPUsNews

AMD to Update Radeon RX 6000 GPUs w/ 16GHz GDDR6 1z Chips, Mining Performance Set to Improve

AMD will be updating its Radeon RX 6000 graphics cards with faster memory chips in the fourth quarter of 2022 to achieve bandwidths of up to 512 GB/s. This was announced by Micron the other day. As per the memory manufacturer, AMD will adopt its new GDDR6 memory chips manufactured on the 1z process, allowing for a nice boost in external bandwidth to 512GB/s.

Micron is passionate about driving cutting-edge graphics product innovation for our customers. Our GDDR6 ultra-bandwidth solution, in collaboration with AMD’s GPU manufacturing capabilities, will provide an enhanced user experience and advanced performance in gaming.

Mark Montierth, VP and GM of High Performance Memory and Networking at Micron

However, the cards featuring these chips will only land in the fourth quarter of 2022, roughly a year from now. By then, AMD will already be prepping to launch its next-gen RDNA 3 graphics cards which will reportedly feature a chiplet design (like the Ryzen CPUs).

At present, Samsung is the primary supplier of GDDR6 memory chips for both AMD and NVIDIA. It’s unclear why Team Red is shifting to a new memory supplier towards the end of the product cycle, but it could have to do with supply and diversifying supply chains before a major launch.

The Radeon RX 6000 series graphics cards were built to deliver high performance without compromising the gaming experience, and the addition of Micron memory to the product line will help us meet that goal. Micron has a strong track record of memory product development, and we’ve worked closely with their engineering team to optimize GDDR6 memory for graphics cards based on the RDNA 2 architecture, giving our board partners more choice and flexibility to produce additional designs for gamers.

Scott Herkelman, VP and GM at Radeon

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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